CSIS Foreign Arrangements Policies and Procedures (2004)

Dublin Core

Title

CSIS Foreign Arrangements Policies and Procedures (2004)

Subject

Information-sharing

Description

Document Purpose: supplements OPS-402 Section 17 Arrangements with Foreign Govts and Institutions

Document Analysis:

Foreign Arrangements Philosophy (one of the few unredacted parts of this doc): CSIS generally enjoys strong relations with all of its key foreign partners. “Our international image as a viable and non-threatening partner generates a large number of requests for assistance from traditional and non-traditional partner services.”

 

Statistics – Section 17 Foreign Arrangements

1984 (at transition from RCMP) – CSIS inherited 162 arrangements in 107 countries

92-93 – 194 arrangements in 121 countries

97-98 – 214 arrangements in 128 countries

02-03 – 237 arrangements in 134 countries

04-05 253 arrangements in 142 countries as of October 18, 2004

 

CSIS does not publicly disclose the agencies it has foreign arrangements with.  

CSIS arrangements with foreign intelligence agencies have increased significantly over the years, indicating that CSIS has arrangements with multiple intelligence agencies of various countries, and likely international organizations of states.

 

“Preoccupation with maintaining necessary intelligence arrangements go a long way a considerable distance in explaining much Canadian government secrecy – the mere chance that disclosure of an ally’s secret would impair intelligence sharing is a considerable source of concern for security officials” (Forcese and Roach, 143).

 

CSIS told a Federal Court in 1996 that the information it receives is “invariably provided in confidence and on the explicit or implicit understanding that neither the information nor its source will be disclosed without prior consent of the entity which provided it.” This principle is widely recognized within the policing and security intelligence communities (Forcese, NS Law, 482).

 

In emergency circumstances, CSIS can cooperate with foreign intelligence organizations where no arrangement exists. If the Minister is unavailable to approve an arrangement, the Director can undertake “whatever exchanges or cooperation are necessary” to address such an urgent requirement.

Records relating to foreign arrangements will be maintained.

Creator

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Source

ATIP

Publisher

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Date

2004

Contributor

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Rights

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Relation

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Type

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Files

Citation

“CSIS Foreign Arrangements Policies and Procedures (2004),” Secret Law Gazette, accessed April 22, 2018, http://secretlaw.omeka.net/items/show/6.

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